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Old-school martial arts films return in style

By YAHYA SSEREMBA

Summary: Still dominant are traditional themes featuring Sino-Japanese hostility (Ip Man – 2008), western colonial oppression (Fearless – 2006) and even Shaolin Temple (Shaolin – 2011). But these stories flow in a manner that thrills the modern watcher.

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Profitable jobs you can start with very small capital

This article, by unveiling untapped job opportunities in the creative industry, exposes the baselessness of the claim that the youth are too poor to create their own jobs.

CREATIVE INDUSTRY: An alternative employment opportunity for the youth

By YAHYA SSEREMBA

A paper presented to the YOUTH IN LEADERSHIP FORUM-organised symposium of Northern Uganda youth leaders held on 10, FEBRUARY 2012, in Arua Town.

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Why Uganda’s film industry moves one step forward, two steps back


ISAAC GODFREY GEOFFREY NABWANA, or simply NABWANA IGG, is the maker of Uganda’s most popular but rudimentary action films: Rescue Team, Who Killed Captain Alex, and Return of Uncle Benon. His ill-equipped Ramon Film Productions, which he sometimes calls Wakaliwood, has also produced Ekisa Butwa, Byabuuka, and Ekisaddaaka Baana. Drawing on his seven-year experience, Mr. Nabwana, 40, told The Campus Journal news web’s YAHYA SSEREMBA and ABUBAKAR SEMATIMBA why the country’s film industry has failed every test except survival. The excerpts:

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Students organise news anchoring competition to honour Bbale Francis


Our Reporter

Students of UMCAT School of Journalism and Mass Communication have organised a news anchoring competition to identify talent and to honour preeminent news anchor Bbale Francis.

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How UBC Abuses Workers


YAHYA SSEREMBA

Their footage is often overshadowed by darkness that one finds it extremely difficult to view the pictures. Their signals are constantly on-and-off even in the station’s neighborhood and, given irregularities in the ill-equipped production department, news is sometimes read without any footage.
 

Read more: How UBC Abuses Workers